What are Mechanics’ Institutes?

Mechanics’ Institutes are the forerunners of public libraries and adult education in Australia. The Mechanics’ Institute movement began in 1799 when Dr George Birkbeck conducted a series of free lectures for the working men of Glasgow. The term ‘mechanic’ at that time meant artisan, tradesman or working man. The definition may have become more specific during the Industrial Revolution when workers became increasingly associated with machinery.

The movement spread throughout Britain and its colonies including Canada, South Africa,India and Australia, as well as the United States of America. The movement began in Victoria with the formation of the Melbourne Athenaeum in 1839. The Institutes served as focal points for their communities, offering libraries and reading rooms, opportunities for self education, and other attractions such as lectures, meeting rooms, museums, concerts and various games. Institute libraries were regularly patronised up until the 1950s even though conducted on a subscription basis. The book stock varied with the finances of the Institute committee but where towns were serviced by railways, cases of books could be obtained quarterly on loan from the Melbourne Public Library.

Nearly every town in Victoria had a Mechanics’ Institute. Institute committee members were dedicated to the improvement of the cultural, educational and social life of the inhabitants of their local communities. With the passage of time and the creation of enlarged educational, welfare, recreational and library facilities, Mechanics’ Institutes gradually lost their pre-eminence, particularly after World War II. Today there are over 500 still operating in Victoria as halls and homes for local organisations. A growing number of these are members of the Mechanics’ Institutes of Victoria Inc. (est. 1998). Six Mechanics’ Institutes in Victoria continue to principally offer a lending library service.

References

If you would like further information about mechanics’ institutes and their history, visit the website of the Mechanics’ Institutes of Victoria.



A Chronological history of the Prahran Mechanics’ Institute